Kimberley Kohan Artist

Caring For Your Paintings

You are considering investing in a Kimberley Kohan painting or you may be one of Kimberley’s patrons, having invested in a selection of her work. Art is an investment. With time, your investment will grow and your purchased art, increase in value. As with any investment it does require some care as well as some regard to placement of your paintings. This will ensure your investment will continue to deliver the bright, eye-catching colour that attracted you to Kimberley’s painting in the first instance.

Proper Care and Display of Your Gouache painting

Gouache is a type of watercolour and by its very nature gouache paintings are fragile and are therefore framed behind glass. Professional watercolor papers give paintings a good base. The weight of the paper adds stability to the work. Kimberley uses a paper that is top quality and one of the heavier Arches, French made cotton papers, 300lb/640gsm. She uses a selection of high quality Australian and European made gouache colours, selected for their steadfastness. Kimberley’s framer uses only acid-free matboard for matting as this avoids any leaching out of colour from the matboard unto the painting.

Three things on your care list:

  1. Do not place your painting in direct sunlight. 
Indirect light is best, if not just for the painting itself, but to reduce glare from a painting behind glass. Artwork should never be displayed on walls that are illuminated with sunlight at any time of the day. The best policy is to artwork in rooms with low levels of direct or artificial lighting.
  2. Do not display your painting in an excessively damp location. They have no protection against moisture. Any moisture developing between the painting and the surface of the glass will wash out colours and might lead to the additional and irreparable problem of mold.
  3. Inspect the back of your painting to check that the tape has not lifted. Over time the tape will deteriorate and will need to be replaced. There is a danger of insects, particularly silverfish who are partial to paper, using the opportunity to access the paper via areas were the tape has lifted. Paintings hung in very warm houses or in hot climates are more prone to the tape lifting.

Proper Care and Display of Your Oil Painting

Oil paint is a type of slow-drying paint that consists of particles of pigment suspended in a drying oil, commonly linseed oil. Kimberley uses a selection of Australian, European and American made oil paints, with stretched canvas as the main support. Kimberley’s oil paintings once dry are protected with the application of a coat of varnish.

Three things on your care list:

  1. Display in areas away from temperature extremes. Oils will crack when suddenly exposed to dry heat or cold temperatures. Try to avoid hanging an oil painting near a fireplace, heater, air conditioning vents or units, in a bathroom, or on a poorly insulated exterior wall.
  2. Do not place your painting in direct sunlight. The ultraviolet of natural sunlight will cause an oil painting to fade. Artwork should never be displayed on walls that are illuminated with sunlight at any time of the day. The best policy is to hang oil paintings in rooms with low levels of direct or artificial lighting.
  3. Display in rooms free of airborne pollutants. Oil paintings generally are protected by varnish, unlike pastel and gouache paintings, which are found behind glass. Over time, fireplace, fly droppings, kitchen grease and tar from cigarette smoke may attach to the surface of your oil painting. To avoid this type of damage from happening to your oil paintings, it's best to hang them in areas where the air quality of the room is clean.

Proper Care and Display of Your Pastel Painting

The beautiful pastel medium is a pure colour pigment particles which catch and refract the light. Kimberley uses pastels that are the finest in light-fastness currently available on the market (equivalent to oils in light-fastness). Pigments used in making pastels are the same pigments that are ground for use in making oil and watercolour paints. The pastel is applied to high quality acid-free and/or archival surface. This archival paper surface is developed specifically for pastel. This surface feels similar to very fine sand paper (called a hard "tooth") and it allows heavy layering of pastel pigment.

Generally the tooth of the paper is sufficient to hold the pastel in place as long as the painting is appropriately handled. Kimberley refrains from using layers of fixative to avoid the dampening effect on the refractive nature of the medium. For this reason, in the process of moving or shipping a painting you may find a small amount of pastel particles become dislodged from the surface of the painting. This is typical and in no way affects the quality of the painting.

For maximum protection and permanence the pastel paintings are framed with an acid free backing and framed with glass.

Four things on your care list:

  1. Do not place your painting in direct sunlight. 
Indirect light is best, if not just for the painting itself, but to reduce glare from a painting behind glass. Artwork should never be displayed on walls that are illuminated with sunlight at any time of the day. The best policy is to artwork in rooms with low levels of direct or artificial lighting.
  2. Do not display your painting in an excessively damp location. They have no protection against moisture. Any moisture developing between the painting and the surface of the glass will wash out colours and might lead to the additional and irreparable problem of mold.
  3. Inspect the back of your painting to check that the tape has not lifted. Over time the tape will deteriorate and will need to be replaced. There is a danger of insects; particularly silverfish who are partial to paper, using the opportunity to access the paper via areas were the tape has lifted. Paintings hung in very warm houses or in hot climates are more prone to the tape lifting.
  4. Pastel artwork should also be protected from jarring and never be laid or carried in a face-down position because both of these actions can cause some pastel dust to dislodge from the surface. If such dust is noticed, it will not harm the image because there is so much pigment on the paper. However, if it is a bother to you, your framer will be able to easy remove it.

Environmental Factors:

These are just a few tips for the proper care and display of your Kimberley Kohan paintings. For a more comprehensive guide about caring for your art collection, visit the various conservation websites. Art is meant to last. By taking simple steps, you can ensure you will have your paintings to enjoy for years to come.

If you have any questions or concerns about your particular painting, please do not hesitate to contact Kimberley and she will be more than happy to address your question.